Discovery of Some Previously Unknown Map Stamps

New Caledonia sc651

New Caledonia sc651

New Caledonia scC275

New Caledonia scC275

China sc3031

China sc3031

South Korea sc1516

South Korea sc1516

Cartophilatelic Society president Mark Honig informs us of finding some previously unknown map stamps. First up is the 170fr August 26, 1991 issue from New Caledonia for the French Institute of Scientific Research (sc651). A number of research themes are depicted on this very colorful stamp. In the center is a stereo or dissecting microscope and on the stage of the microscope is a map of New Caledonia.  Definitely a hidden map! The next newly discovered map stamp also comes from New Caledonia. The 130fr airmail issue of July 20, 1996 marks the Indonesian Centenary (scC275). The stamp depicts a man and woman dressed in traditional Indonesian attire. Behind the couple is a tree. In the branches and leaves of the tree, the islands of the Indonesian Archipelago can be seen. A very interesting and uniquely designed map stamp. From the South Pacific we move to North Asia.  Here, the first newly discovered map stamp is from the June 1, 2000 “Stampin’ the Future” children’s stamp design issue (sc3031). The 60f denomination stamp features an image of a young girl in front of a computer screen which depicts a map of China and Taiwan and a “bridge being constructed” across the South China Sea between China and Taiwan. The next discovery is from South Korea (sc1516), with the 80w October 8, 1988 issue marking the 22nd Congress of The International Iron and Steel Institute, that we assume was held in Seoul about that time.   This thematic stamp depicts a large foundry ladle in a steel mill pouring out molten metal. A world map with a very interesting looking projection is shown on the side of the ladle. For our final discovery we move to the Netherlands and a personal note from Mark regarding the next newly discovered map stamp. Mark writes, when I was browsing ebay for map stamps I noticed this stamp with what looks like a small map. I immediately knew I must have this stamp because it is a stamp from my own country. I pulled my album and I scanned for the stamp. This stamp has been issued, as part of a set of 4, to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the liberation for the Netherlands from nazi-Germany in 1945.  The detail shown in the map is part of a newspaper, “The Flying Dutchman,” air-dropped by the Allied Air Forces, and shows the Russian front advancing from Tarnopol to Cherzon.  After a bit of searching I found the map was shown on  the cover of the March 16, 1944 issue. I’m a bit embarrassed to admit that this stamp has been in my album for 28 years without me noticing it as a map stamp.  The stamp (and set) are not expensive. The stamp has also been issued as a coil stamp. These coil stamps can be recognized by the cut perforations along the top and bottom. Mint coils have a number on the back of every 5th stamp.  Perhaps now is the time to check your own collections for more hidden map stamps, you never know what may be hiding there. Please let us know what you find!

Netherlands sc666

Netherlands sc666

"The Flying Dutchman," March 16, 1944

“The Flying Dutchman,” March 16, 1944